Feeding

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FEEDING 

Young chicks, still eyes closed, may need some extra help.

They will respond gaping excitedly, so extra care is necessary.

-Be absolutely careful, beak is really fragile
-Hold the bird gently but securely if necessary.
-With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak
-With the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened
-Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers, you may need to do so more than once to give the proper amount.
-Letting free the beak help the swallowing reflex.
-Do it calmly but quickly, natural parents pass the “bolus”, the ball of compressed food, to to chick in just a second.
-Feed proper amounts, a chick may eat up to 20g of insect a day.

hand-rearing swifts

"From Little Things Big Things Grow" Paul Kelly (c)Torreferrussa Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre has open doors to all of you, always will ; Swifts or any other orphan in need of care, housing and food. Our effort and energy is for you. We are here working hard to let you see the world you deserve, the world that is yours.

Gepostet von Falciot Vencejo Swift Rehabilitation am Dienstag, 28. Juni 2016

FEEDING REALLY YOUNG CHICKS

FEEDING REALLY YOUNG CHICKSYoung chicks, still eyes closed, may need some extra help. They will respond gaping excitedly, so extra care is necessary. -Be absolutely careful, beak is really fragile-Hold the bird gently but securely if necessary. -With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak-With the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened-Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers, you may need to do so more than once to give the proper amount.-Letting free the beak help the swallowing reflex.-Do it calmly but quickly, natural parents pass the “bolus”, the ball of compressed food, to to chick in just a second.-Feed proper amounts, a chick may eat up to 20g of insect a day. Do please, check the other videos to learn about a proper diet, preparation and supplementation. ——————————————————————–There are three basics to be addressed when hand-feeding chicks: FREQUENCY, when to feed; QUANTITY, how much to feed, and the most important TECHNIQUE, how to feedImportant! Food can not be provided until the patient has been properly rehydrated -FREQUENCY:Changes on frequency of feedings occur related usually to the chick age as the clinical condition.On feathered chicks the recommendation is a feeding every 3 hours (e.g.: 8:00, 11:00, 14:00, 17:00, and 20:00), sure this can be extended to an extra feeding.Naked chicks and patients on poor condition the intervals of feedings and infusions should be done every 30’ – 1h-QUANTITY:The amount of food can vary depending on many factors such as age and clinical condition. At times chicks can be fed to satiation particularly at the begging stage.Begging behaviour should be observed in almost all healthy chicks. It is the natural response of nestlings to get parents attention thus obtaining the food collected by the parents once they arrive at the nest. Chicks respond by bobbing their heads, chattering loudly and gulping anything close.Often begging behaviour can be observed until near the end of growth when the fledgling is about to be released, however normally at the later stage they stop begging and refuse eating. Refusing food is also normal in weak birds, adults and fledglings admitted at the latest stages of growing. These birds have to be force fed.The quantity varies depending of the bird age (appetite that decreases with increasing age), state of development or clinical condition. Even though on average a swift chick could eat from 15g to 20 g of insects a day.Special attention!On starving begging birds where digestive system may not work properly and need to be activated initially by infusion (Fluid therapy). We can exanimate if the chick assimilates correctly the feedings by touching the stomach. The belly should be well filled but still soft and flexible. If it appears hard and extended feeding should be suspended and moved to infusion.-TECHNIQUE:When a chick is begging, its mouth can be held carefully with a finger open long enough to insert the insects with round-headed tweezers. With some practice, the chick will learn soon to gulp the mealworms, crickets and other insects directly from the tweezers.Each bird should be given as many insects as it will eat; they let their throats be filled with food.Older fledglings, adults or individuals that refuse to eat may have to be force fed until release, being easier cricket for its capsule shape .All birds have to be softly restrained with a cloth (if handlers have sweetly hands), paying attention on begging chicks as the fast movements induced by the excitement may induce a feather or more serious damage.Hold the bird gently but securely. With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak, then with the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened. Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers and let free the beak. Help the swallowing reflex by rubbing gently the gorge. Many times the food is spit out, so you have to be patient until swifts get use to it.Obviously at admission particularly when birds are dehydrated, infusion procedures are established.

Gepostet von Falciot Vencejo Swift Rehabilitation am Donnerstag, 31. Mai 2018

EMACIATED BIRDS, slow slow …

Successful treatment for emaciation involves rehydration. With starving bird usually you can see dramatic signs of improvement over the first couple of days, probably as the result of warmth and rehydration. Even so afterwards the underlying conditions may reassert.

An emaciated bird given food may use the last energy trying to digest it, being dehydrated cannot process solids. In addition a bird with hypothermia can cause the food stay unabsorbed and souring in the digestive tract.

EMACIATED BIRDS, slow slow …Successful treatment for emaciation involves rehydration. With starving bird usually you can see dramatic signs of improvement over the first couple of days, probably as the result of warmth and rehydration. Even so afterwards the underlying conditions may reassert.An emaciated bird given food may use the last energy trying to digest it, being dehydrated cannot process solids. In addition a bird with hypothermia can cause the food stay unabsorbed and souring in the digestive tract.Severe emaciated chick (see video 1 – Clinical examination)

Gepostet von Falciot Vencejo Swift Rehabilitation am Donnerstag, 2. Juli 2015

 

ALPINE SWIFT (Tachymarptis melba)

Fledge age in Alpine Swifts is about 45-50 days, just a bit more than the Common Swift, 36-42 days

ALPINE SWIFT

ALPINE SWIFT (Tachymarptis melba), an amazing Swift speciesOur chicks at Torreferrussa Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre! Fledge age in Alpine Swifts is about 45-50 days, just a bit more than the Common Swift, 36-42 days Last year, more than 300 Alpine Swifts were admitted at the centre with a great rehabilitation successFurther information of interest: http://phys.org/news/2013-10-alpine-swift-aloft-days.htmlhttp://www.arkive.org/alpine-swift/tachymarptis-melba/http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=1773

Gepostet von Falciot Vencejo Swift Rehabilitation am Montag, 27. Juni 2016

 

Alpine Swift orphan

Feeding the beast !Quick, safe and enough amount – the main rules An Alpine Swift can eat up to 40g of insect a day, distributed in 5 feedingshttps://www.researchgate.net/publication/228091178_Food_habits_of_the_alpine_swift_on_two_continents_Intra-_and_interspecific_comparisons

Gepostet von Falciot Vencejo Swift Rehabilitation am Montag, 20. August 2018


Speed feeding, a necessity when hand-rearing hundreds but sure quite a real way of feeding imitating natural parents when they pass to the chick the food “bolus”, the ball of compressed food, in just a sec.

Even though, not so easy in severe condition birds or fledglings when refusing food. These patients require som more time, just a different kind of food item or some help in the swallow action. For instance, fledglings love wax worms or at least they swallow them easily. In the same way, a chick refusing to eat at the first stage usually accept well a wax worm cut by the middle….the worm fluids help in the swallowing. Also a drop of just water may help the chick to swallow the item (Alternatively we use also suerum glucosate, chamomile, vitamin B complex, electrolytes and amino acids compounds)

Speed feeding, a necessity when hand-rearing hundreds but sure quite a real way of feeding imitating natural parents when they pass to the chick the food “bolus”, the ball of compressed food, in just a sec.Even though, not so easy in severe condition birds or fledglings when refusing food. These patients require som more time, just a different kind of food item or some help in the swallow action. For instance, fledglings love wax worms or at least they swallow them easily. In the same way, a chick refusing to eat at the first stage usually accept well a wax worm cut by the middle….the worm fluids help in the swallowing. Also a drop of just water may help the chick to swallow the item (Alternatively we use also suerum glucosate, chamomile, vitamin B complex, electrolytes and amino acids compounds)Video: Feeding Alpine Swifts

Gepostet von Falciot Vencejo Swift Rehabilitation am Freitag, 22. Juli 2016

Again!

-Be absolutely carefull, beak is really fragile
-If you have sweaty hands, use a handkerchief to avoid feathers spoil
-Not always is easy……be patient. Many times the food is spit out, so you have to be patient until the Swift get use to it

Observe the method:

-Hold the bird gently but securely
-With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak
-With the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened
-Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers and let free the beak
-Help the swallowing reflex by rubbing gently the gorge.

Feeding s Swift

FEEDING A SWIFT-Be absolutely carefull, beak is really fragile-If you have sweaty hands, use a handkerchief to avoid feathers spoil-Not always is easy……be patient. Many times the food is spit out, so you have to be patient until the Swift get use to itObserve the method:-Hold the bird gently but securely-With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak-With the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened-Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers and let free the beak-Help the swallowing reflex by rubbing gently the gorge.——————————————————————–There are three basics to be addressed when hand-feeding chicks: FREQUENCY, when to feed; QUANTITY, how much to feed, and the most important TECHNIQUE, how to feedImportant! Food can not be provided until the patient has been properly rehydrated -FREQUENCY:Changes on frequency of feedings occur related usually to the chick age as the clinical condition.On feathered chicks the recommendation is a feeding every 3 hours (e.g.: 8:00, 11:00, 14:00, 17:00, and 20:00), sure this can be extended to an extra feeding.Naked chicks and patients on poor condition the intervals of feedings and infusions should be done every 30’ – 1h-QUANTITY:The amount of food can vary depending on many factors such as age and clinical condition. At times chicks can be fed to satiation particularly at the begging stage.Begging behaviour should be observed in almost all healthy chicks. It is the natural response of nestlings to get parents attention thus obtaining the food collected by the parents once they arrive at the nest. Chicks respond by bobbing their heads, chattering loudly and gulping anything close.Often begging behaviour can be observed until near the end of growth when the fledgling is about to be released, however normally at the later stage they stop begging and refuse eating. Refusing food is also normal in weak birds, adults and fledglings admitted at the latest stages of growing. These birds have to be force fed.The quantity varies depending of the bird age (appetite that decreases with increasing age), state of development or clinical condition. Even though on average a swift chick could eat from 15g to 20 g of insects a day.Special attention!On starving begging birds where digestive system may not work properly and need to be activated initially by infusion (Fluid therapy). We can exanimate if the chick assimilates correctly the feedings by touching the stomach. The belly should be well filled but still soft and flexible. If it appears hard and extended feeding should be suspended and moved to infusion.-TECHNIQUE:When a chick is begging, its mouth can be held carefully with a finger open long enough to insert the insects with round-headed tweezers. With some practice, the chick will learn soon to gulp the mealworms, crickets and other insects directly from the tweezers.Each bird should be given as many insects as it will eat; they let their throats be filled with food.Older fledglings, adults or individuals that refuse to eat may have to be force fed until release, being easier cricket for its capsule shape .All birds have to be softly restrained with a cloth (if handlers have sweetly hands), paying attention on begging chicks as the fast movements induced by the excitement may induce a feather or more serious damage.Hold the bird gently but securely. With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak, then with the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened. Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers and let free the beak. Help the swallowing reflex by rubbing gently the gorge. Many times the food is spit out, so you have to be patient until swifts get use to it.Obviously at admission particularly when birds are dehydrated, infusion procedures are established.

Gepostet von Falciot Vencejo Swift Rehabilitation am Dienstag, 21. Juni 2016

and again!

FEEDING AN ALPINE SWIFT

There are three basics to be addressed when feeding swifts: FREQUENCY, when to feed; QUANTITY, how much to feed and TECHNIQUE, how to feed

Important! Food can not be provided until the patient has been properly rehydrated (See post TREATING WILDLIFE CASUALTIES – 4. INITIAL CARE AND STABILIZATION, FLUID THERAPY)

-FREQUENCY:

Changes on frequency of feedings occur related usually to the clinical condition.

The recommendation is a feeding every 3 hours (e.g.: 8:00, 11:00, 14:00, 17:00, and 20:00).

On patients on poor condition the intervals of feedings and infusions should be done every 1h

-QUANTITY:

The amount of food can vary depending on many factors such as age and clinical condition.

Refusing food is normal in weak birds, adults and fledglings admitted at the latest stages of growing. These birds have to be force fed.

-TECHNIQUE:

The mouth is held carefully with a finger open long enough to insert the insects with round-headed tweezers. With some practice, the patient will learn soon to gulp the mealworms, crickets and other insects directly from the tweezers.

Each bird should be given as many insects as it will eat; they let their throats be filled with food.

Older fledglings, adults or individuals that refuse to eat may have to be force fed until release, being easier cricket for its capsule shape .

All birds have to be softly restrained with a cloth (if handlers have sweetly hands), paying attention on begging chicks as the fast movements induced by the excitement may induce a feather or more serious damage.

Hold the bird gently but securely. With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak, then with the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened. Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers and let free the beak. Help the swallowing reflex by rubbing gently the gorge. Many times the food is spit out, so you have to be patient until swifts get use to it.

Obviously at admission particularly when birds are dehydrated, infusion procedures are established.

 

FEEDING AN ALPINE SWIFTThere are three basics to be addressed when feeding swifts: FREQUENCY, when to feed; QUANTITY, how much to feed and TECHNIQUE, how to feedImportant! Food can not be provided until the patient has been properly rehydrated (See post TREATING WILDLIFE CASUALTIES – 4. INITIAL CARE AND STABILIZATION, FLUID THERAPY)-FREQUENCY:Changes on frequency of feedings occur related usually to the clinical condition.The recommendation is a feeding every 3 hours (e.g.: 8:00, 11:00, 14:00, 17:00, and 20:00).On patients on poor condition the intervals of feedings and infusions should be done every 1h-QUANTITY:The amount of food can vary depending on many factors such as age and clinical condition. Refusing food is normal in weak birds, adults and fledglings admitted at the latest stages of growing. These birds have to be force fed.-TECHNIQUE:The mouth is held carefully with a finger open long enough to insert the insects with round-headed tweezers. With some practice, the patient will learn soon to gulp the mealworms, crickets and other insects directly from the tweezers.Each bird should be given as many insects as it will eat; they let their throats be filled with food.Older fledglings, adults or individuals that refuse to eat may have to be force fed until release, being easier cricket for its capsule shape .All birds have to be softly restrained with a cloth (if handlers have sweetly hands), paying attention on begging chicks as the fast movements induced by the excitement may induce a feather or more serious damage.Hold the bird gently but securely. With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak, then with the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened. Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers and let free the beak. Help the swallowing reflex by rubbing gently the gorge. Many times the food is spit out, so you have to be patient until swifts get use to it.Obviously at admission particularly when birds are dehydrated, infusion procedures are established.

Gepostet von Falciot Vencejo Swift Rehabilitation am Dienstag, 12. April 2016

 

There are three basics to be addressed when hand-feeding chicks: FREQUENCY, when to feed; QUANTITY, how much to feed, and the most important TECHNIQUE, how to feed
Important! Food can not be provided until the patient has been properly rehydrated

-FREQUENCY:
Changes on frequency of feedings occur related usually to the chick age as the clinical condition.
On feathered chicks the recommendation is a feeding every 3 hours (e.g.: 8:00, 11:00, 14:00, 17:00, and 20:00), sure this can be extended to an extra feeding.
Naked chicks and patients on poor condition the intervals of feedings and infusions should be done every 30’ – 1h

-QUANTITY:
The amount of food can vary depending on many factors such as age and clinical condition. At times chicks can be fed to satiation particularly at the begging stage.
Begging behaviour should be observed in almost all healthy chicks. It is the natural response of nestlings to get parents attention thus obtaining the food collected by the parents once they arrive at the nest. Chicks respond by bobbing their heads, chattering loudly and gulping anything close.
Often begging behaviour can be observed until near the end of growth when the fledgling is about to be released, however normally at the later stage they stop begging and refuse eating. Refusing food is also normal in weak birds, adults and fledglings admitted at the latest stages of growing. These birds have to be force fed.
The quantity varies depending of the bird age (appetite that decreases with increasing age), state of development or clinical condition. Even though on average a swift chick could eat from 15g to 20 g of insects a day.
Special attention!
On starving begging birds where digestive system may not work properly and need to be activated initially by infusion (Fluid therapy). We can exanimate if the chick assimilates correctly the feedings by touching the stomach. The belly should be well filled but still soft and flexible. If it appears hard and extended feeding should be suspended and moved to infusion.

-TECHNIQUE:
When a chick is begging, its mouth can be held carefully with a finger open long enough to insert the insects with round-headed tweezers. With some practice, the chick will learn soon to gulp the mealworms, crickets and other insects directly from the tweezers.
Each bird should be given as many insects as it will eat; they let their throats be filled with food.
Older fledglings, adults or individuals that refuse to eat may have to be force fed until release, being easier cricket for its capsule shape .
All birds have to be softly restrained with a cloth (if handlers have sweetly hands), paying attention on begging chicks as the fast movements induced by the excitement may induce a feather or more serious damage.
Hold the bird gently but securely. With the head restrained open carefully the beak with the right finger index placing the fingernail between upper and lower beak, then with the left finger index hold the beak slightly opened. Place the insects carefully into the rear of the throat with the tweezers and let free the beak. Help the swallowing reflex by rubbing gently the gorge. Many times the food is spit out, so you have to be patient until swifts get use to it.

Obviously at admission particularly when birds are dehydrated, infusion procedures are established.